Once and Future Fan

I keep up with fandom slightly more regularly than I celebrate Jewish holidays.
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Posts tagged "writing"

ghostcat3000:

ghostcat3000:

ghostcat3000:

professorfangirl:

(Nicked from iambickilometer):

drop one of these bad boys in my askbox and i will post, without editing

  • FIRST — the first two sentences of my current project
  • LAST — the most recently written two sentences of my current project
  • NEXT — the next line. meaning i will finish the sentence I’m on and write a new one, which you’ll get.
  • [insert prompt here] — you post a prompt, and i’ll write three sentences based on that prompt, set in the same time/setting as my current project
  • THE END — i’ll make up an ending, or post the ending if i’ve written it
  • BEFORE THE BEGINNING — three sentences (or more) about something that happened before the plot of my current project
  • POV — something that’s already happened, retold from another character’s perspective

This has been really helpful so far. Hit me up please. I’d really appreciate it. 

jaqofspades replied to your post: querulousgawks asked:It’s a bit l…

but that little touch of melancholy makes the happy so much more precious. Lovely :D

Thanks.  I love Weevil a lot, but I have a hard time not having everything I write about him have a strong angst component.  

Okay… maybe that is a problem I just have in general.

backofthebookshelf:

fangirlasplosian:

I Just Want More Fic Without Having to Write It Myself

-A Biography

#not an autobiography for obvious reasons

(via enigmaticagentalice)

Asker shoesforall Asks:
Were any books you read particularly meaningful to you as a person or in your desire to become an author?
lodessa lodessa Said:

courtneymilan:

Oh, there have been hundreds.

If there hadn’t been books that were meaningful to me as a person, I would never be an author. Books have always been my best friends—always. I could start listing them, but there are seriously so many of them that it’s just impossible for me to do that.

The books that drove me to be an author, though—the ones that specifically made me say “I can do this”? Happened to be the books that pissed me off. They’re the ones where I got enraged and stabby and annoyed, because of something that set me off, and made me think, “Well, if I were going to write a book, I would…”

That’s pretty much the story of how I decided to write books. I was driven to it by rage.

awritersruminations:

In the journal I do not just express myself more openly than I do to any person; I create myself. The journal is a vehicle for my sense of selfhood. It represents me as emotionally and spiritually independent. Therefore (alas) it does not simply record my actual, daily life but rather—in many cases—offers an alternative to it.

—Susan Sontag, Reborn: Journals and Notebooks, 1947-1963

(via afrogeekgoddess)

The first draft is just you telling yourself the story.
TERRY PRATCHETT (via phatalbert)

(via liminal-zone)

glamaphonic:

jimhines:

I’ve talked about fanfiction before, but it’s never been something I chose to write myself … until last month, when I was listening to my kids watch Christmas special #1,826, and my brain wandered off to imagine what a Rudolph vs. Frosty throwdown (snowdown?) would look like…

LOOK RAWLES IS POSTING ABOUT FANFIC AS A TRANSFORMATIVE WORK WITH UNIQUE ARTISTIC VALUE IN AND OF ITSELF AGAIN

Anyway, this is my fave part of this post by Jim C. Hines:

Writing good fanfic is just as challenging as writing good anything else. I’ve sold close to 50 pieces of short fiction in my time. That silly little Frosty story took as much work as any piece of professional fiction I’ve done. I struggled with plotting and characterization, I lay awake at night trying to work out the problems, I went back and did last-minute edits before each scene went live. Sure, it’s possible to write lousy, half-assed fanfiction, just like it’s possible to write lousy, half-assed anything else. But nothing about fanfiction makes it inherently easier to write than other kinds of fiction.

But I like the whole thing.

If you’re a boy writer, it’s a simple rule: you’ve gotta get used to the fact that you suck at writing women and that the worst women writer can write a better man than the best male writer can write a good woman. And it’s just the minimum. Because the thing about the sort of heteronormative masculine privilege, whether it’s in Santo Domingo, or the United States, is you grow up your entire life being told that women aren’t human beings, and that women have no independent subjectivity. And because you grow up with this, it’s this huge surprise when you go to college and realize that, “Oh, women aren’t people who does my shit and fucks me.”

And I think that this a huge challenge for boys, because they want to pretend they can write girls. Every time I’m teaching boys to write, I read their women to them, and I’m like, “Yo, you think this is good writing?” These motherfuckers attack each other over cliche lines but they won’t attack each other over these toxic representations of women that they have inherited… their sexist shorthand, they think that is observation. They think that their sexist distortions are insight. And if you’re in a writing program and you say to a guy that their characters are sexist, this guy, it’s like you said they fucking love Hitler. They will fight tooth and nail because they want to preserve this really vicious sexism in the art because that is what they have been taught.

And I think the first step is to admit that you, because of your privilege, have a very distorted sense of women’s subjectivity. And without an enormous amount of assistance, you’re not even going to get a D. I think with male writers the most that you can hope for is a D with an occasional C thrown in. Where the average women writer, when she writes men, she gets a B right off the bat, because they spent their whole life being taught that men have a subjectivity. In fact, part of the whole feminism revolution was saying, “Me too, motherfuckers.” So women come with it built in because of the society.

It’s the same way when people write about race. If you didn’t grow up being a subaltern person in the United States, you might need help writing about race. Motherfuckers are like ‘I got a black boy friend,’ and their shit sounds like Klan Fiction 101.

The most toxic formulas in our cultures are not pass down in political practice, they’re pass down in mundane narratives. It’s our fiction where the toxic virus of sexism, racism, homophobia, where it passes from one generation to the next, and the average artist will kill you before they remove those poisons. And if you want to be a good artist, it means writing, really, about the world. And when you write cliches, whether they are sexist, racist, homophobic, classist, that is a fucking cliche. And motherfuckers will kill you for their cliches about x, but they want their cliches about their race, class, queerness. They want it in there because they feel lost without it. So for me, this has always been the great challenge.

As a writer, if you’re really trying to write something new, you must figure out, with the help of a community, how can you shed these fucking received formulas. They are received. You didn’t come up with them. And why we need fellow artists is because they help us stay on track. They tell you, “You know what? You’re a bit of a fucking homophobe.” You can’t write about the world with these simplistic distortions. They are cliches. People know art, always, because they are uncomfortable. Art discomforts. The trangressiveness of art has to deal with confronting people with the real. And sexism is a way to avoid the real, avoiding the reality of women. Homophobia is to avoid the real, the reality of queerness. All these things are the way we hide from encountering the real. But art, art is just about that.

Junot Diaz speaking at Word Up Bookshop, 2012 (via ofgrammatology)

(via borntoselfdestruct)

No writing is wasted. Did you know that sourdough from San Francisco is leavened partly by a bacteria called lactobacillus sanfrancisensis? It is native to the soil there, and does not do well elsewhere. But any kitchen can become an ecosystem. If you bake a lot, your kitchen will become a happy home to wild yeasts, and all your bread will taste better. Even a failed loaf is not wasted. Likewise, cheese makers wash the dairy floor with whey. Tomato gardeners compost with rotten tomatoes. No writing is wasted: the words you can’t put in your book can wash the floor, live in the soil, lurk around in the air. They will make the next words better.
Erin Bow (via writersrelief)

(via glamaphonic)

Screw writing “strong” women. Write interesting women. Write well-rounded women. Write complicated women. Write a woman who kicks ass, write a woman who cowers in a corner. Write a woman who’s desperate for a husband. Write a woman who doesn’t need a man. Write women who cry, women who rant, women who are shy, women who don’t take no shit, women who need validation and women who don’t care what anybody thinks. THEY ARE ALL OKAY, and all those things could exist in THE SAME WOMAN. Women shouldn’t be valued because we are strong, or kick-ass, but because we are people. So don’t focus on writing characters who are strong. Write characters who are people.
Words of great wisdom on strong female characters~ by madlori (via laughingskeleton)

(via yellow-crow)

vintageblackglamour:

Langston Hughes, September 1966: “Since most Negro writers from Chesnutt to Leroi Jones have found it hard to make a literary living, or to derive from other labor sufficient funds to sustain creative leisure, their individual output has of necessity often been limited in quantity, and sometimes in depth and quality as well - since Negroes seldom have time to loaf and invite their souls. When a man or woman must teach all day in a crowded school, or type in an office, or write news stories, read proofs and help edit a newspaper, creative prose does not always flow brilliantly or freely at night, or during that early morning hour torn from sleep before leaving for work. Yet some people ask, “Why aren’t there more Negro writers?” Or, “Why doesn’t Owen Dodson produce more books?” Or “how come So-and-So takes so long to complete his second novel”? I can tell you why. So-and-So hasn’t got the money. Unlike most promising white writers, he has never sold a single word to motion pictures, television or radio. He has never been asked to write a single well-playing soap commercial. He is not in touch with the peripheral sources of literary income that enable others more fortunate to take a year off and go somewhere and write.” 

vintageblackglamour:

Langston Hughes, September 1966: “Since most Negro writers from Chesnutt to Leroi Jones have found it hard to make a literary living, or to derive from other labor sufficient funds to sustain creative leisure, their individual output has of necessity often been limited in quantity, and sometimes in depth and quality as well - since Negroes seldom have time to loaf and invite their souls. When a man or woman must teach all day in a crowded school, or type in an office, or write news stories, read proofs and help edit a newspaper, creative prose does not always flow brilliantly or freely at night, or during that early morning hour torn from sleep before leaving for work. Yet some people ask, “Why aren’t there more Negro writers?” Or, “Why doesn’t Owen Dodson produce more books?” Or “how come So-and-So takes so long to complete his second novel”? I can tell you why. So-and-So hasn’t got the money. Unlike most promising white writers, he has never sold a single word to motion pictures, television or radio. He has never been asked to write a single well-playing soap commercial. He is not in touch with the peripheral sources of literary income that enable others more fortunate to take a year off and go somewhere and write.” 

(via afrogeekgoddess)

Realizing you should have cross tagged all your ASOIAF fics for GoT two years ago: facepalm-ey.

glamaphonic:

ferrific:

falling-towers:

balladedutempsjadis:

prinzessinfantaghiro:

Like, if a girl gets hanged for fucking Jaime Lannister, she should at least get the chance to actually fuck him.

Yes! And I bet he’s good in bed too because I bet Cersei made sure he knew how to please her ;)

As much as I agree with the general sentiment, this would probably be the most awkward first time ever: blushing virgin with body issues galore and emotionally confused guy whose sexual experience consists of fucking his sister.

Aaaaawkwaaaard.

I can’t articulate why, but I really want to read that.

I have loved a lot of Jaime/Brienne fic, but I have NEVER EVER read a sex scene between them that was as awkward as it needs to be.

And that makes me sad.

I always end up cutting out the sex scenes when I write them because I can’t bring myself to make it as awkward/uncomfortable as makes sense… so I just have thousands of words of unfinished Jaime/Brienne porn on my harddrive.

“What are you thinking, Doctor?” She asked, holding her breath and feeling the growing tightness in her chest.

“That I am almost a thousand years old and I know better, but I can’t help hoping that we are rewriting history, because I don’t want the future you lived to be the real one.”

“Don’t say that.” Martha told him, choking on tears and laughter, “I know you need to save the world, more than anything.”

“Not this time.” The Doctor promised her, “Not if I have to lose you.”

“I’ll still be here.” Martha argued, hollowly, “You just won’t remember or care.”

It was almost funny, how easy it was to tell the Doctor things she couldn’t make herself believe when she was alone.  

“I’m going to find a way.” The Doctor insisted, “Time can be rewritten.”